The Blinders – Columbia

 

There’s been a bit of hype around The Debut Album by The Blinders amongst the writers at WFM blog, and Lottie gave us a statement that honestly made me scratch my head. She said ‘The Blinders are going to take over the world’. 

Alex was counting down the minutes, and Lottie gave every one the precise timing of 150 minutes till launch, like we were all staring at a pizza through the oven window.

Andy had been given the pleasure of listening to the 12 track album before the date of its release, and ever since then, he’s been quiet. Not a peep. I think the first time he’d spoke in days was a simple ‘it’s a bit good’. As if he’s being held hostage and managed to communicate to the outside world away from his kidnappers. I was starting to wonder if he’d left the house at all since the album had started.

But then I listened to the album on its release day. And it became obvious of Andy’s sudden disappearance. 

He was fixated while plugged into this album on repeat for days, paralysed by guitar riffs, and thunderous drum + bass that’s taking him on a trippy musical merry-go round. 

Thats exactly what I experienced only 3 tracks in. ‘Hate song’ was a drug. The commanding lyrics ‘Dance dance dance to the hate song’ was very Transmission – Joy Division. It has significant affect on the mind and body, it’s like your brain is in a tin can then kicked down a fight of stairs. It’s easy to totally loose control of yourself in this track. It’s constructed that way, possibly tweaked and mastered to turn you into a puppet on a string, in the hands of the blinders. And there’s nothing you can do about it. 

Where no man comes’ drum tempo steadies the ship, but it’s a real footprint. It’s coloured with Arctic Monkey‘s sounding guitar effects, that pierce and play with your soul. With those instrumentally combined it’s going to take a special vocal. And that’s exactly what you receive. An unparalleled dynamic of its own. You could mute the instruments and have this voice alone, that could tame Satan.

Free the slave’ is a speech, a declaration of no more tolerating bullshit in society. 

Free the blossoming flower soon to be a women, obstructed by the stereotypes of history, that do not belong to you or to me’. ‘Free the boy soon to be a man, in a society like this, who the fuck would want that!?’

It sends you into a spin when the gripping guitar riffs of ‘I can’t breathe’ rain upon you. Thumping bass pedals ripping off every gig ceiling they’ll be played in.

Et Tu’ had that same hypnotic instrumental qualities. ‘Et tu, Brute?’ Meaning ‘You too, Brutus?’ were the last words spoken by Julius Caesar in Shakespeare’s play when he was stabbed by his best friend Brutus. If you can’t trust your best friend, who can we trust?

L’etat c’est Moi, ( I am the state) Is a statement sung with belief and confidence, and you can feel the power in those words and it’s expressed through musical class. 

Brave new world’ is my personal favourite. It’s unbelievably catchy. It’s a lot like Kasabian-Shoot the runner. ‘Rat in a cage’ is a close contender.

But all in all this whole album is a Kasabian, Joy division, and Arctic monkey‘s trifle.

It’s difficult to put into words on how class it actually is.

There’s truth and meaning behind every song, and they’ve injected their musical talents around it. It’s contagious, intriguing, and sounds as though taking over the world is highly possible. 

Who’s going to stop them?

  

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1 Response

  1. September 22, 2018

    […] “There’s truth and meaning behind every song, and they’ve injected their musical talents around it. It’s contagious, intriguing, and sounds as though taking over the world is highly possible. Who’s going to stop them?” – Captain Sound Blog http://captainsound.co.uk/new-releases/the-blinders-columbia/ […]

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